'Wir greifen immer an'
"Bad Wolf" - Doctor Who fans rejoice in my Vietnam War helmet graffiti… 

"Bad Wolf" - Doctor Who fans rejoice in my Vietnam War helmet graffiti… 

I and a portion of my Vietnam living history outfit got to go flying around in Vietnam Veteran Huey with BRUCE ‘SNAKE’ CRANDALL, Medal of Honor recipient!! History!!! Charlie 1/27 ‘Wolfhounds’ - 25th ID Living History Group. 

I and a portion of my Vietnam living history outfit got to go flying around in Vietnam Veteran Huey with BRUCE ‘SNAKE’ CRANDALL, Medal of Honor recipient!! History!!! Charlie 1/27 ‘Wolfhounds’ - 25th ID Living History Group. 


Fallschirmjager:This really is a good view as to why the Fallschirmjäger were crazier than all fuck. That static-line is 9 meters long (29 feet long), hence why they are falling in the “Superman” position to help alleviate the jerk of the line. They practiced this over and over and over, and for good reasoning. Unlike the Luftwaffe pilot parachute (RZ 36), it was not controllable (as one could be in that era) and they hit at an average speed of 35 miles an hour.  This is also why unlike the Allied AB forces, who jumped armed, the Fallschirmjäger did not, outside of their side arm, which consisted of a P-38 or a Browning High-Power.  The exception being the NCOs jumping with their MP-40s, the “regular” Fallschirmjäger had to find their weapons containers which were pushed out with each “stick’s” jump. This is why there was a 10-15% injury/fatality amongst their operations. And also for the record, the Fallschirmjäger were the only arm of the Third Reich who were composed of all volunteers.

A Ju-52 based in Virginia will be letting us nut ball history nerds jump from their plane this year. 

Fallschirmjager:
This really is a good view as to why the Fallschirmjäger were crazier than all fuck.
That static-line is 9 meters long (29 feet long), hence why they are falling in the “Superman” position to help alleviate the jerk of the line. They practiced this over and over and over, and for good reasoning. Unlike the Luftwaffe pilot parachute (RZ 36), it was not controllable (as one could be in that era) and they hit at an average speed of 35 miles an hour.
 This is also why unlike the Allied AB forces, who jumped armed, the Fallschirmjäger did not, outside of their side arm, which consisted of a P-38 or a Browning High-Power.
 The exception being the NCOs jumping with their MP-40s, the “regular” Fallschirmjäger had to find their weapons containers which were pushed out with each “stick’s” jump.
This is why there was a 10-15% injury/fatality amongst their operations.
And also for the record, the Fallschirmjäger were the only arm of the Third Reich who were composed of all volunteers.

A Ju-52 based in Virginia will be letting us nut ball history nerds jump from their plane this year. 

The Browning Hi Power. Developed by John Browning, designer of the famous M1911 pistol and Dieudonné Saive, introduced in 1935. The single-action 9mm pistol features a double stack magazine that can hold 13 rounds, hens the name ‘Hi Power’. Used by more nations than any other pistol in history and it’s still in service by numerous armed services and police agencies all over the world.  I’ll save you a full history lesson and recommend reading up on the history of the BHP on the interwebs. Keeping with the theme of this particular blog, the Fabrique Nationale plant in Belgium was overtaken in 1940 by the Germans who in turn immediately kept pumping the excellent pistols out for their own forces. The BHP was very much sought after  because of it’s high capacity 13 round magazine and reliability. It held more rounds than the P-08 Luger (8rd) or P-38 Walther (also 8rd) and was easier to clean and maintain than both of the standard German made pistols. It takes me no more than one minute to field strip the weapon with no tools and reassemble; not a feasible task with a P08 or P38. It was primarily issued to Fallshirmjager and Waffen SS troops throughout the war. 

The Browning Hi Power. Developed by John Browning, designer of the famous M1911 pistol and Dieudonné Saive, introduced in 1935. The single-action 9mm pistol features a double stack magazine that can hold 13 rounds, hens the name ‘Hi Power’. Used by more nations than any other pistol in history and it’s still in service by numerous armed services and police agencies all over the world.  I’ll save you a full history lesson and recommend reading up on the history of the BHP on the interwebs. Keeping with the theme of this particular blog, the Fabrique Nationale plant in Belgium was overtaken in 1940 by the Germans who in turn immediately kept pumping the excellent pistols out for their own forces. The BHP was very much sought after  because of it’s high capacity 13 round magazine and reliability. It held more rounds than the P-08 Luger (8rd) or P-38 Walther (also 8rd) and was easier to clean and maintain than both of the standard German made pistols. It takes me no more than one minute to field strip the weapon with no tools and reassemble; not a feasible task with a P08 or P38. It was primarily issued to Fallshirmjager and Waffen SS troops throughout the war. 

Fallshirmjager display. Reenactment at Peoria, IL Dec2012. Display by 7th Kompanie, Fallshirmjager Regt. 6, Midwest USA 

Fallshirmjager display. Reenactment at Peoria, IL Dec2012. Display by 7th Kompanie, Fallshirmjager Regt. 6, Midwest USA 

Fallshirmjager reenactors. Reenactment: Peoria, IL Dec2012 Group: 7th Kompanie, Fallshirmjager Reg. 6 - Midwest USA.

Fallshirmjager reenactors. Reenactment: Peoria, IL Dec2012 Group: 7th Kompanie, Fallshirmjager Reg. 6 - Midwest USA.

Chicago area WW2 reenactors of the 2nd Panzer Division, World War Two Historical Reenacting Society at a reenactment in Peoria, IL. Dec.2012

Chicago area WW2 reenactors of the 2nd Panzer Division, World War Two Historical Reenacting Society at a reenactment in Peoria, IL. Dec.2012

Heer reenactors. (L) 1914 WW1 and (R) 1944 WW2 

Heer reenactors. (L) 1914 WW1 and (R) 1944 WW2 

great blog you got. very cool being a reenactor. when i was in the national guard we were billetted in the same barracks area as a group of reenactors. i was hugely impressed with their dedication and accuracy plus they were good guys to billet with.we missed the reenactment due to our training schedule but it was a pleasure to see wehrmacht walking around. my uncles marched in the german 6th army.

Thank you much. Sadly I haven’t updated much lately as I’ve been busy with work, college, and traveling. Hopefully some new things soon. Reenacting is a real blast and I’ve learned a lot. Got to spend a lot of time with WW2 Vets. I’ve personally had a number of conversations with a late war FJ and a Heer assault gun commander who was at Kursk. We do one or two reenactments per year at the Nat Guard base at Fort Custer in Battle Creek, MI. Met a lot of great Soldiers (US and Canadian) and Marines there who really dig our hobby. I guess that accounts for why about 3/4 of reenactors are former military. Thanks for the note and also props on your blog, I also enjoy yours.

Made it to London! Thankfully I work midnights in America so no jet lag. Although I am having a morning pint before traveling about.